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How To Not Worry

It seems to me, we worry because we think it is doing something when we do it. Kind of like if we run in place somehow we’ll make it to the market. Worse yet, it’s as if we run in place while tearing out our hair.

Sorry you had to read that, but I think it’s a good metaphor for what worry is. It is torture and, not only that, it does nothing. Yet we think it does.

We have to ask ourselves exactly what is happening when we worry and what it is doing.

Let’s explore.

h.koppdelaney, Flickr. Some rights reserved.

Desire

When we look a little closer at worry we see that we want something. We are looking for a result. We expect it. Specifically, “I” want something for “me”. I want me to continue and for me to continue then this “me”, or “I”, must be kept strong, reinforced, must get what “I” expect.

The center, the so-called self, the ego is fearful of not existing. The ego is made up of thought, of memory, of the past and of future projections, the expectations, the ideals, the fear of loss and the regret of not being “important”, the need to continue whatever it is that derives pleasure and what avoids pain. Ego, in other words, is thought up. It’s untrue, mere fabrications of thinking.

This is the struggle. This desire is the cause of much illusion. Obviously, we don’t have what we want, or else there wouldn’t be a thought to get what we want. It’s yet one more projection of thought. Yet, one more false projection of thought.

 

Time

We have these thought-projections in time. That is, we think in time. Take it further, thought is time. We think about what will happen. We really don’t know. Thought-projections and time are not real. It’s just thinking.

But we want control, want to believe there is an entity in control. And that entity is time; the past and illusory thought of tomorrow. That, again, is the “me”.

It’s Me

We think if we worry, then someone is there to do something. We believe someone will meet the problem. Oddly enough, that someone is thought, is time. It is the same problem that I’ve already mentioned. Also, oddly enough, when you see this deeply, you will dissolve the problem.

 

What I Don’t Mean

I don’t mean you must be insensitive. I don’t mean you must become desensitized. To the contrary, looking directly at the inner workings of your mind requires great sensitivity. In that, there is sensitivity to what is happening around you.

We have this belief in psychological security, that somehow we can get this psychological security, that we can have it, possess it. We believe it exists. That word believe is very important here. We think it exists. As we’ve discussed, thought-projection is the problem itself, it is illusory: It is the struggle, it is a tread-mill: It’s that running in place that I mentioned at the beginning of this discussion.

So, we can see that thought and time create fear. Fear is thinking. The thought of “I” is full of fear. It is always struggling to protect itself, always trying to maintain something or get something.

Like I said, when you see deeply that these things are products of thought, you see them for what they are and the problem dissolves.

The dragon is slain when the dragon is understood.

By Wolfgang Staudt (originally posted to Flickr as early) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Featured image: photoloni, Flickr. Some rights reserved.

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